Spotlight on Allegrini

Allegrini Valpolicella DOC 2006
This wine has been consistently clean and refreshingly full of acidity, though in previous vintages it was labeled as being only from the Classico district. 60% Corvina, 35% Rondinella and 5% Molinara. Estate bottled in Fumane di Valpolicella 13% $14.95 in the spring of ’08 and up $3 to $17.99 in Oct. ’08 at Traverso’s

Allegrini

Allegrini Veronese IGT Palazzo Della Torre 2004
70% Corvina, 25% Rondinella and 5% Sangiovese are harvested from the Palazzo Della Torre vineyard. This wine appeared to be suffering some sub-threshold cork taint in the latest bottle. 70% of the crop is harvested in early September and vinified straight away while the rest is harvested in late October and dries until just after Christmas. These dried grapes are reintroduced to the young wine and another ferment kicks off in early January, adding body and richness to the final wine. Aged in oak for 15 months. Estate Bottled in Fumane di Valpolicella 13.5% $16.99 at Bottle Barn

Allegrini Veronese IGT La Grola 2004 In March of ’09 this wine has moved into an earthier, funkier zone, with the brett blooming and the tannin profile becoming more drying and astringent. 70% Corvina, 15% Rondinella, 10% Syrah and 5% Sangiovese are harvested from the La Grola vineyard in the Classico district. Notes from ’08: This wine was complex, of medium weight and a little tannic. All of the crop is harvested in early October and feremented straight away – no drying as with the Palazzo. Aged in oak for 16 months. Estate Bottled in Fumane di Valpolicella 13.5% $20.99 and up to $21.69 in March of ’09 at Bottle Barn

Allegrini

About Ray

Ray Johnson is the Executive Director of the Wine Business Institute at Sonoma State University. He writes about food and wine, his travels and the business of wine. He makes his home in Sonoma County, California.
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